Full Sun, Partial Sun, Does it Really Matter?

Tree Care Full Sun, Partial Sun, Does it Really Matter? By Sheereen Othman | October 8, 2018 There has been a recent craze in the plant scene. Suddenly everyone wants house plants, desk plants and mini succulents that they can scatter throughout. And why shouldn’t they want plants, there are so many benefits to them environmentally and aesthetically. Naturally, I jumped on the fad and bought my first succulent, a leatherpetal. I put it on my nightstand under my window and figured my work was done. But then a couple weeks later the leaves started to droop. What was happening to my succulent? I (embarrassingly) overlooked one of the most basic rules of plant care: sun exposure. My succulent was under my window, so it wasn’t getting enough sun. In fact, it wasn’t getting any sun. That same care my succulent needed transitions to outdoor plants as well, like trees. Of all the things we tout when it comes to tree planting and care, the right tree in the right place is at the..
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The Grand Gardens of Baltimore  by  Susan Harris

Baltimore may be best known nationally for its murder rate and The Wire on HBO, but in horticulture circles it’s known for plants and gardens. So I happily signed up for a regional Garden Writers Association event featuring some top drawer gardens in and just outside of Baltimore. Here are my favorite shots from the day. Above, author Kathy Hudson (left) with Penney and A.C. Hubbard, owners of the garden at the center of the gorgeous book On Walnut Hill (foreword by our own Allen Bush). The garden was designed by the renowned plantsman largely responsible for Baltimore’s critical role in horticulture – the late Kurt Bluemel. Caryopteris This little courtyard sits just outside Penney Hubbard’s office, from which she enjoys the soothing sounds of the waterfall. I love how a potted Japanese maple fills this corner of the court, and probably looks interesting all winter. Next, the garden of landscape architect Carol Macht. We eagerly explored the long views from inside the home, espe..
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Do You 811?

Tree Planting Do You 811? By Arbor Day Foundation | October 5, 2018 If not, you should. It can save your life and protect the environment. Guest post by Mary Patricia Kindt, Underground Safety Alliance. Does 811 sound familiar? For tree lovers, or anyone who ever digs or does underground work of any sort, it’s a very important number to know. The “Call Before You Dig” number, better known as 811, is the national federally designated phone number for underground line locating. However, thanks to the progression of technology, there is now an easier and faster way to have your utility lines marked, and that is with online locate requests (learn more at Call811.com). Either way, 811 is synonymous with underground safety. Contacting 811 is free, and is a public service intended to keep the public and environment safe. The 811 number has been around for 11 years, although the Call Before You Dig system was in place long before that. With population growth and the ceaseless ..
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How about a wall of flowers?  by  Elizabeth Licata

Louise Jones, Wildflowers for Buffalo Recently, several Facebook friends have issued pleas for “palate cleansing” posts, preferably containing puppies and other cute animals or anything innocently funny or endearing. The idea is to get a break from the barrage of horrifying/despicable/sinister images and information that have been flashing through our social media feeds for the last twenty months or so. São Paulo mural by Mona Caron At the same time, I have noticed an increase in botanically themed murals. There are several artists who are creating spectacular examples of these, including Mona Caron, who is perhaps best known for gigantic murals of commonly occurring wildflowers in her Weeds series. These include a mural of Chamerion angustifolium on the side of building in Portland, and a mural loosely based on Achyranthes aspera in São Paulo (shown above). The first mural in the series, The Botanical Mural, in San Francisco, is 292 x 4–17 feet in size. By hugely magnifying and beau..
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Native Plants in Containers  by  Thomas Christopher

I visited a fascinating native plants garden this past week, the Mount Cuba Center in Hockessin, Delaware. A botanical garden devoted to the native plants of Delaware’s Piedmont plateau, Mt. Cuba is preserving 1,000 acres of this special habitat. It also provides object lessons about how you can use native plants in your own landscape, whether formal or informal. I was especially interested in the container plantings, which had, to my eye, a special kind of beauty. They also provided examples of ways a novice might get started with natives. They would fit into any kind of garden, even the sort of formal landscape into which a gardener might be reluctant, at least initially, to invite native plants with their less refined, more naturalistic look. Leucithoe (top) with heucheras I took the opportunity to meet with the Mt. Cuba gardener who is responsible for designing, planting and maintaining the containers, Donna Wiley. She offered several useful tips for a gardener who is beginning t..
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Investing in Community Trees

Urban and Community Forestry/Green Infrastructure Investing in Community Trees By Matt Spitsen | October 1, 2018 NeighborWoods Month Marks the Celebration of Community Forests Young people are told that if they want to retire comfortably, they need to start saving a little money early in life. Deposits, even with low interest rates, over time, add up to surprisingly large yields of cash. This same concept can be applied to trees. The “deposits” are trees planted, and the yields are the myriad benefits trees provide. Why Tree City USA? Why YOUR City? One of the greatest forces in helping grow community forests are local non-profit organizations like those that are part of the Alliance for Community Trees network. These community-based organizations are dedicated to planting and caring for trees. They are the boots on the ground and they are changing towns and cities across the country. National Wildlife Federation reports that there are up to 200 million spaces alon..
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